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In today’s post we continue with the PROCESSES theme. This time, we chronicale a DIVERGENT PROCESS that is taking place.

The DIVERGENT PROCESS has to do with different sectors of the “faithless”, dare I say atheist community parting ways on the issues of morals, absolutes and of God.

On the one hand, we have the admitted (nominal) “atheists” (i.e. Stefan Molyneux) coming to the reasoned position that there are no moral universal absolutes without God, and an “atheist” society just doesn’t work. In other words, without the absolutes that God provides to His creation, society completely breaks down.

One very poingiant observation, and one that is explained in toto by the LEX ARMATICUS is that the society which is the most convinced in it’s absolutes, is the one that will dominate the other, less certain ones.

The case for the nominal “atheists” getting religion is contained in the above video. It is a must watch, and is so good that it should be watched more than once and promolgated far and wide.

On the other hand, we have nominal “catholics” who have long ago lost their faith and have adopted a post-Modernist cum Marxist understanding of “time and space”.

This position is represented by Francis, the bishop of Rome and a large part of the post-conciliar church. The key to a proper understanding this group’s loss of faith, is to understand that they completely reject the notion of absolutes.

Here are the main tenants of their “faith” as described in the post below:

Post Structuralists like de Certeau, more widely known as Postmodernists, believe all reality is fiction or “narrative.”

They change the “narrative” or story usually to compile with their leftist or liberal views on politics, sexual morality or whatever their pet project happens to be.

They rarely use scholarship to backup their “narrative” point of view, only mind numbing long confusing writing that obscures instead of clarifying.

The Postmodernists in the media are one exception to the obscurantism of non-clarity.

Their “narratives” are clear and well written, but again rarely is there scholarship or strong evidence to backup their stories. They use spin to obscure.

Media spin “narrative” is “news and information that is manipulated or slanted to affect its interpretation and influence public opinion.” (Dictionary.com)

They usually use their “narratives” in history, news, the Bible and any writing as a vehicle to promote their ideological ideas.

Yes, it sums Francis, the bishop of Rome and the FrancisRabbitTheology™ to a “T”!

On an aside, how many of you dear readers think that Francis actually read Michel de Cereau?

Yea, I don’t either.

It appears that the identification of Cereau as Francis’s favorite “philosopher” is a case of TeamFrancis putting in place some ex post facto justification for Francis’ eratic “teaching office”. Once again the key passage, and I can’t stress this point enough:

They usually use their “narratives” in history, news, the Bible and any writing as a vehicle to promote their ideological ideas.

Which leads to the question of why they need a “philosophical” read ideological justification in the first place?

The answer is provided by Dr. John Lamont: (see here)

The key to the neomodernist capture of power is however also the reason for their failure to sustain a religious culture. Neomodernism is not like Protestantism, which contains ideas with a positive content as well as being a rejection of Catholicism. These ideas – justification by faith, and the like – are not correct, but they say something substantial, and have an appeal that can give rise to an important movement. Neomodernism, however, on a religious level is a purely negative thesis. As a result it has no attractive force of its own, and ecclesiastical structures that fall into its grip eventually die away – a process now visible all over the world. This is one thing that on the natural level permitted the survival of Thomism, despite the drastic measures taken to uproot it from the Church; unlike neomodernism, it has something positive and substantial to say. Moreover, what it has to say is actually true. This is in no way a guarantee of broad success, but it ensures the continued existence of Thomism in the small constituency of good scholars who are concerned with the truth and in a position to discover it. Whether it will expand much beyond this constituency in the future is unknown, but there is no doubt that its future shows more promise than that of neomodernism.

So the complete disintegration of neo-Modernism as a “philosophical” base for sustaining a “religious culture” has moved the post-conciliar NUChurch further down the Nihilist continuum and squarely into the post-Modernists (Marxist) camp.

But the good news is on the other side. It would now appear that the “small constituency” of Thomist scholars that has survived the post-conciliar suppression is now being joined by secular philosophers and academics in the battle against post-Modernism, read Nihilism.

Who would have thunk?

*****

Pope Francis and Nihilism (see here)

Does Pope Francis believe that there is no “possibility of an objective basis for truth” and that there is no objective meaning or reality? (Dictionary.com definitions of nihilism)

The nihilist Michel de Certeau believed in all of the above.

The present Pope considers him the most eminent modern theologian. Francis said:

“For me, de Certeau is still the greatest theologian for today.” (onepeterfive.com, March 8, 2016, “Pope Francis Reveals His Mind to Private Audience”)

De Certeau in his greatest book “Heterologies” said:

“It is not Mr. Foucault who is making fun of domains of knowledge… It is history that is laughing at them. It plays tricks on the teleologists who take themselves to be the lieutenants of meaning. A meaninglessness of history.” (“Heterologogies,” Pages 195-196)

Historian Keith Windschuttle shows that the Pope’s favorite modern theologian is a radical who thinks that there is no outside reality. Windschuttle wrote:

“Of all the French theorists… de Certeau is the most radical. He is critical of the poststructuralist Foucault for his use of documentary evidence and of Derrida for the way he privileges the practice of writing. For de Certeau, writing is a form of oppression… he argues… writing itself constitutes the act of colonisation…”

“Like both structuralist and poststructuralist theorists, de Certeau subscribes to the thesis that we have access only to our language and not to any real, outside world…”

“De Certeau claims that writing can never be objective. Its status is no different from that of fiction. So, because history is a form of writing, all history is also fiction.” (“The Killing of History,” Pages 31-34)

By Francis’s greatest modern theologian’s logic then Jesus Christ, true God and true man, who walked the earth during the reign of Pontius Pilate is fiction.

The central doctrine of Catholism, the Incarnation, is fiction.

Post Structuralists like de Certeau, more widely known as Postmodernists, believe all reality is fiction or “narrative.”

They change the “narrative” or story usually to compile with their leftist or liberal views on politics, sexual morality or whatever their pet project happens to be.

They rarely use scholarship to backup their “narrative” point of view, only mind numbing long confusing writing that obscures instead of clarifying.

The Postmodernists in the media are one exception to the obscurantism of non-clarity.

Their “narratives” are clear and well written, but again rarely is there scholarship or strong evidence to backup their stories. They use spin to obscure.

Media spin “narrative” is “news and information that is manipulated or slanted to affect its interpretation and influence public opinion.” (Dictionary.com)

They usually use their “narratives” in history, news, the Bible and any writing as a vehicle to promote their ideological ideas.

With that background, here is the Pope’s favorite theologian’s central religious ideas. The de Certeau Scholar Johannes Hoff wrote:

“According to this new approach to the Biblical narrative, the focal event of Christianity is not the incarnation, the crucifixion, or the resurrection of Christ, but the empty tomb. The Christian form of life is no longer associated with a place, a body, or an institution, but with a quest for a missing body: the missing body of the people of Israel, and mutatis mutandis the missing body of Jesus.”
(Article by Johannes Hoff, “Mysticism, Ecclesiology And The Body Christ: Certeau’s (Mis-) Reading of Corpus Mystium and the Legacy of Henri de Lubac” Page 87, Titus Brandsma Institute Studies In Spirituality, Supplement 24, “Spiritual Spaces: History and Mysticism in Michel De Certeau”)

The nihilist theologian believes that the central truths of Christianity are about “absence” or nonexistence. De Certeau scholar Graham Ward wrote:

“For de Lubac the… Eucharist is not a sign of the presence of Christ’s body, it is Christ’s body… And yet Certeau… makes the Eucharist (as later the church and body of mystical text he treats) into substitutes, acts of bereavement, signs of absence.” (“Michel de Certeau – in the Plural, ” Page 511)

In other words, Francis’s greatest modern theologian believes that the Eucharist is not the body of Christ present, he doesn’t even believe it is a sign of the presence of Christ’s body like some Protestants, but a sign of “absence.”

Might de Certeau’s influence on Francis be the reason he never kneels before the Eucharist, but kneels to wash the feet of those he like Certeau might consider oppressed?

De Certeau’s influence on Francis may be the reason he reportedly said:

“It is not excluded that I will enter history as the one who split the Catholic Church.” (Der Spiegel magazine, December, 23, 2016)

De Certeau scholar Frederick Christian Bauerschmidt wrote:

“Certeau… came increasingly to stress the clash of interpretation, the “law of conflict,” that applies even to the church. Under the pressure of this clash, the ecclesial/eucharistic body is “shattered.” (“Michael de Certeau – in the Plural”, Page 359)

Francis’s greatest modern theologian doesn’t believe in the central truths of the Catholic Church.

The Pope’s most eminent modern theologian doesn’t even believe in objective truth.

Does Francis believe in the central doctrines of the Catholic Church or in objective truth?

The question needs to be asked:

If the Pope is a disciple of de Certeau and Postmodernism, then what ultimately do he and these thinkers believe in?

Philosopher Stephen Hicks said:

The “Left thinkers of the 1950s and 1960s… Confronted by the continued poverty and brutality of socialism, they could either go with the evidence and reject their most cherish ideals – or stick by their ideals and attack the whole idea that evidence and logic matter…”

“Postmodernism is born of the marriage of Left politics and skeptical epistemology…”

“Then, strikingly, postmodernism turns out not to be relativistic at all. Relativism becomes part of a rhetorical political strategy, some Machiavellian realpolitik employed to throw the opposition off track…”

“Here it is useful to recall Derrida: ‘deconstruction never had any meaning… than as a radicalization… within the tradition of a certain Marxism, in a certain spirit of Marxism.'” (“Explaining Postmodernism,” Page 90, 186)

For Postmodernists like de Certeau, Derrida, Foucault and possibly Francis, if he is their disciple, falsehood or truth doesn’t matter.

The only thing that matters is achieving power for their liberal or leftist ideology.

Internationally renowned theologian Dr. Tracey Rowland said Francis’s “decision – making process” outlined in Evangelii Gaudium is “the tendency to give priority to praxis over theory.”

She states that chapter eight of Amoris Laetitia “might be described as the praxis chapter rather than a theory chapter.” Theory meaning Catholic doctrine.

The renowned theologian asks how footnote 351 of Amoris Laetitia “can be consistent with paragraph eighty-four of John Paul II’s Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris consortio and paragraph twenty-nine of Benedict XVI’s Apostolic Exhortation Sacramentum Caritatis? A pastoral crisis may arise if the lay faithful and their priests have to choose between… two Popes (John Paul II and Benedict XVI) on one side, and a third Pope (Pope Francis) on the other.” (“Catholic Theology,” Page 192, 198, 199)

The choice appears to be between the infallible doctrines of the Catholic Church or praxis “theology.”

Rowland says “praxis types agree in rejecting classical metaphysics.” She then explains praxis ideology or “theology”:

“Doctrinal theory is at best extrinsic and secondary. The reflex character of theory-praxis tends toward a reduction of theory to reflection on praxis as variously understood. The normativity tends toward an identification of Christianity with modern, secular (liberal or Marxist) process.” (“Catholic Theology,” Page174)

If what the internationally renowned theologian is saying is true of Pope Francis and praxis “theology,” then the Church is in the greatest crisis in history.

The Church has a Pope who has betrayed Jesus Christ and His Gospel for the world.

Francis has exchanged the Gospel of Jesus Christ for “secular (liberal or Marxist)” ideology.

Pray for the Church, the beloved bride of Jesus Christ.

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